Cheeky Yarn-Bombed Trees

The challenge to photography something cheeky gives Claremontography the chance to post some photos of the current yarn-bombing of the trees in front of the Chamber of Commerce. Perhaps this year it isn’t so much an irreverent act as it seemed to be a year ago.

Claremont Trees

Claremont Yarn Bomb

Claremont

Yarn Bomb Claremont

via Photo Challenge: Cheeky

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Claremont City Tree

This one could be debated for a long time. Claremont has been a Tree City USA for over 30 years and has over 23,000 trees. Two species, the American Elm and the Eucalyptus are historic specimens.

But because both of those species were transplanted into southern California, I think that one of our native trees should be our city tree, and I submit my vote for the Live Oak Tree. These huge trees are all over the city and in the hills. Here is one in the RSABG and a little grove on the Claremont Wilderness Trail.

 

The leaves are small, curved and very spiky. It’s not so much fun to walk barefoot under one of these trees.

 

 

Trees and Art: It’s Gotta Be Claremont

In our city of Trees and PhDs we have a vibrant art community. Last month art and trees intersected in several events.

The newest exhibit at RSABG features art inspired by Johnson’s Pasture, painted by Kendall Johnson, great-grandson of the people who originally purchased the land in the foothills above Claremont. Ken spoke at the opening reception on July 21.

 

 

Earlier in the month on July 17, Sustainable Claremont along with Claremont Heritage hosted a panel of artists at the Claremont Museum of Art to discuss the intersection of art and trees. The Tree Speak exhibit is now over and the current exhibit is Dee Marcellus Cole and Carnival Seekers – open until November 26, 2017.

 

Poetry that is San Francisco

Outside City Lights, the iconic San Francisco IMG_4627bookstore, in the alley between it and Vesuvio Cafe, resides this quote from the founder and owner of the landmark. The poem Changing Light by Ferlinghetti begins

The changing light
                 at San Francisco
       is none of your East Coast light
                none of your
                        pearly light of Paris

 

One could spend all days observing this changing light of San Francisco in the POPOS (Privately Owned Public Open Spaces) in the nearby Financial District.

These spaces range from indoor atriums to outdoor gardens and even a small redwood forest at the base of the Transamerica Pyramid building. Most had some sort of art. Some were closed on Sunday when we tried to see as many of them as possible, but that just gives us a reason to come back another time.