Views from LA City Hall

LA City HallAfter our LA Art Tour, and a little lunch at the Wurstküche (recommended!), we weren’t quite ready to leave DTLA. I’m not sure how it is that we have lived in So Cal for over 30 years and have never been inside the iconic LA City Hall. Our day had come. The only trick to getting through security was that H had to remove his small Swiss Army Knife from his keychain and “hide” it somewhere outside (next to another, larger Swiss Army Knife).

A list of instructions in about 10 languages explained that   to get to the observation deck, one must take the elevator to the 22nd floor, then find the next set of elevators to get to the 26th floor, and from there, walk up a flight of steps. A kind security guard suggested we stop first at the third floor to look at the rotunda. Very nice.

One can walk all the way around the viewing platform for some great views of the city and the mountains.

Grand Park and Disney Concert Hall are not hard to spot.

The big art piece, that looks like a spaceship, in the lower part of the photo is the Triforum.

LA Triforium

Building reflections and patterns

And, a bell.

LA City Hall Bell

And, yes, we remembered to pick up the hidden Swiss Army Knife on the way out.

Entrance to City Hall is free. Parking is not.

 

College Fountains: Harvey Mudd

When our girls were young, we used to take a Fountain Tour of the colleges. We would ride our bikes through the five undergrad campuses and try to ride by every single fountain.

Harvey Mudd College has three fountains, all of which have water running right now. The main and biggest fountain is the Venus Fountain in Hixon Court. The Venus in the middle is from Italy and was made by Giovanni Bologna in the Renaissance. Years ago it was referred to as the ratio fountain because there was a ratio of four men per woman on campus. Times have changed, and it is much closer to 50:50.

For archival photos of the installation of this fountain, click here.

IMG_5861

IMG_5868

This fountain is more of a contemplative water piece and is tucked away on northwest end of campus. There are benches for quiet reflection.

IMG_5874

The third fountain is in front of the Linde Activities Center (the LAC).

IMG_5782

 

April 2017 Photo Round Up

April went by very quickly. Here are some photos to remember her by.

The wall at Walker Beach at Pomona College expressed its LGBTQ pride.

IMG_5562

Signs ala Berma Shave encouraged students to vote for their favorite professor.

It doesn’t take long, to show you care, about that Professor, who’s always there.

Easter came on a beautiful Sunday

IMG_5582

Claremont hosted its annual Earth Day Fair on the hottest day of the month with temps in the 90s.

IMG_5607

First grade students practiced writing their quarter and eighth notes.

IMG_5570

The college softball season was in full swing….

IMG_5606

And to round off National Poetry Month, here is a favorite one of mine. Enjoy!

Screen Shot 2017-04-27 at 9.00.05 AM

March 2017 Photo Round-Up

As usual, music filled the air in March. The Claremont Concert Orchestra performed Stravinsky’s Firebird Suite and Beethoven’s 5th Piano Concerto. The annual Bach in the Subways allowed for the audience to get up real close and personal.

New stop signs on Harvard Ave. at Harrison show that Claremont thinks of “Safety First”.

The annual Silent Auction at the Folk Music Center ends today. Hurry on down!

With the end of the drought in most of California, everything seems to be in bloom, including allergies. I haven’t heard much complaining, though.

Claremontographer in Kaua’i: Odds and Ends

Beautiful Beaches

Lots of mud

Feral Chickens everywhere

Delightful walk to the Stone Dam

IMG_4315

Cute churches everywhere

IMG_5437

The waterfalls seen on the opening of Fantasy Island episodes

IMG_4505

Little girls from a wedding who were tired of being photographed

IMG_4496

and with this sunset picture, you know the end is here

IMG_5452

Claremontographer in Kaua’i: Ancient Ruins

IMG_4230I can’t hike all day, every day. Sometimes I just want to view historical sites, and if there are old rocks and ruins, so much the better. Since the Hawaiian islands formed from volcanoes, many of the rocks found are volcanic.

Near the Wailua River on Kaua’i’s east side stand ancient Hawaiian temples, or heiau, made of these black rocks.

IMG_4331

The foundations that remain represent various types of sites. One is a Place of Refuge,  others are a war temple, and a place for future kings to be born (Birthstones).

Above some of these ruins is a cemetery with lots of Japanese names on the tombstones.

IMG_4339

On the west side of the island are the remains of Fort Elizabeth (or Elisabeth, I’ve seen both spellings), a Russian outpost from the early 19th century. Notice the red clay dirt. Lots and lots of it all over Kaua’i.

Claremontographer in Kaua’i: Na Pali Coast

IMG_5429

Probably more well known than the Waimea Canyon, the Na Pali Coast has offered up great filming locations and great hiking. The coastal trail runs 11 strenuous miles and takes experienced hikers one day from beginning to end (and another day back – so one must acquire a permit and backpack to and fro). Luckily for us moderate hikers, you can hike in for two miles to the lovely Hanakapi’ai Beach (above) and back in a leisurely half day. We chose not to go the additional two miles to the waterfall.

We joined the long never-ending trail of other hikers (some in flip flops which I’m sure resulted in blisters) and headed up (really UP) the beginning of the trail over tree roots and big rocks after reading the warnings.

IMG_4413

IMG_4414

After a while, we were rewarded with views of not only our starting point, but then what lay ahead.

IMG_4417

IMG_4421

After 90 minutes or so of mostly up and some downs and a lot of stopping (to take pictures, of course), we arrived at the river just before the beach.

Of course, there was a warning not to go in the water.

IMG_4437

Fortunately it had not rained for a few days, so the rocks were available for crossing. Apparently this is not always the case.

IMG_4443

The rocky and sandy beach was a perfect place to spend some well-deserved sitting-time.

With lots of stacked rocks to contemplate and photograph

The hike back still required uphill climbing, but it didn’t take quite as long, and we were back in Hanalei for lunch. My calves and hamstrings are still tight, but it was such an amazing hike that I would do it again. I would say this was probably the highlight of our week.